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Archive for August, 2018

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Edinburgh Fringe 2018 – Days 6-13

On Monday, I had a much-needed day off from both of my shows.

HTWAPQ continues to be a delight and is sold-out nearly every day, with Stop the Press proving to be a hard slog.

Before Sunday’s STP, the couple of hours of heavy rain meant I was unable to do much flyering without getting utterly drenched.

With my day off ever-nearing, I hoped no-one would turn up just so I could start my day break early and have a think about ways to improve the show.

Seven people did arrive, including a couple who witnessed my heroics earlier in the day at HTWAPQ.

Sometimes, performing in front of seven people can be a lot of fun. Unfortunately, this wasn’t one of them. I struggled to connect with both my material and the audience, with everything falling flat.

In the back of my mind, I just wanted it to be over so I could reach my day off. This is perhaps the worst mindset to have for any gig, as the chances of you enjoying it are pretty much zero. Consequently, the audience are even less likely to enjoy it.

People made an effort to my show and what I provided was perhaps one of my most shambolic performances ever. Even when things are going badly, I usually at least get a perverse kick out of it. This time, I hated every second. I think it is probably going to be my lowest point of the Fringe.

So, when things aren’t going well, you have two choices. Either you give up, or you make an effort to improve things.

To find somewhere quiet to go through my set, I returned to the terrace at The Place hotel, which was where my shows were for the past couple of Fringes.

As lovely as Stand 2 is, I do miss that terrace where I could just sit and relax after my show. I would also often be bought pints by my audience, which is the main thing I’m missing this year.

I went through my set did a bit of editing, changed a few things around, and cut other bits. Then as if by magic, Tuesday’s show was significantly better. A break did me good and it was reassuring to know that the last seven months I’ve spent writing this haven’t been a complete waste of time.

I’ve realised the difference between why one show goes so well and why the other doesn’t tend to. A large part is down to certainty and assurance in the material. I know HTWAPQ works, so even if it sometimes takes the audience a little while to get on board, I know they will eventually. STP is still taking shape before my very eyes and I’ve yet to do a gig where everything works exactly as intended, so I will do my best to fake certainty and assurance in the meantime.

The show is not where I want it, but it’s improved since the Fringe began. It will be a relief when I’ve finished the STP run, although I would happily continue HTWAPQ every day for at least another six months.

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Edinburgh Fringe 2018 – Days 4-5

Five shows into HTWAPQ and all is well. Every show is either selling out or getting damn close and the audiences have all been superb.

But you don’t want to read about my successes, do you? Be honest, what you’re here for is to read about my pain and suffering. The last four Fringes have gone a little too well and as a result, this blog lost a little of the edge of the early days.

Well, I have some good news on that front, because I am doing another show this year that is taking me back to my roots. Admittedly, I find much more motivation to write when things are going badly.

So here it is. I have had a couple of tough shows with Stop the Press. On Monday, I had the largest audience the show has ever performed to, with around 25. However, it was a hot room and there was no energy.

A good third of my audience were pensioners looking tired, bored, disappointed or just falling asleep. Another bloke poked his head through the curtain ten minutes in and said he was coming in, but not yet and just stood there awkwardly for a few minutes, telling me to carry on. This made building any sort of momentum trickier in what was already proving a struggle.

Half-way through, I had to resort to opening the door at the back of the room just to let some air in and people dozing off.

Somehow, I kept going. When things aren’t getting much reaction, it’s a natural reaction to let it deflate you. But once you do this, you’ve lost. If you maintain your energy throughout, you’ve at least got a chance of winning them around. My persistence paid off and the biggest laughs came towards the end of the show, but it was a hard slog and pretty far from what I would call a success.

Yesterday’s gig was difficult for different reasons entirely. I had about eight in, with three recent journalism graduates, three older German ladies sitting at the back and two old hacks who used to work at local papers sitting nearest the front.

One of the hacks proved my most troublesome audience member so far. He kept interrupting and asking questions about where exactly I was going with my material, pointing out that the bits that weren’t relevant to local papers. Twice during the show, he left to go to the bar as he said he wasn’t interested in what I was talking about. In short, he was a total arse.

When I said a bit about A Mixed Bag getting a one-star review, he pulled out a reviewers pass from his jacket. I don’t know if he’s going to actually write one, as he didn’t seem  to have any interest in the show, missed large chunks due to buying drinks, and his interruptions made me have to cut a load of stuff from the set.

But if he does write one, I don’t really care what he has to say. If you can’t be bothered to engage with what I’ve written, then I am more than happy to return the favour. Reviews really don’t matter as much as you might think, much less from people who haven’t even seen the full show and also totally disrupt it.

I am trying to avoid counting down the number of shows left I have for Stop the Press. I’m still convinced there is a good show in there and I hope to get it to where I want it during the run. Just 15 to go…

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Edinburgh Fringe 2018: Days 1-3

Edinburgh Fringe 2018 is now underway and I am going to avoid using the obvious pun of saying it’s been A Mixed Bag so far, because it’s actually been pretty good.

How to Win a Pub Quiz has been selling out pretty much every day so far, which is amazing. I’m in Stand 2 this year, which is one of the very best rooms at the Fringe.

Nevertheless, I am missing the terrace out the back of Stand 5, where I would sit for many an hour after my show and was often bought pints by audience members. But from a time and health perspective, it’s something that I can’t really do this year.

The three HTWAPQ shows so far have all been really fun. The new set is getting there, but I’m still tweaking with every show. There is still room for improvement, but it doesn’t require quite so much drastic editing as last year.

For Stop the Press, I Want to Get Off, I’m back at the Kilderkin for the first time since 2015, with a brand new show for the first time since 2014. When I left there, I was playing to packed rooms and turning people away.

Then for my first show Saturday, I had ten people in and two walked out. It didn’t feel quite so much like a triumphant return to my spiritual home, especially as it was a Saturday. But I have to detach myself from comparing it to HTWAPQ. This show is a different animal, albeit a less successful animal. And you really don’t know how something’s going to go until you give it a try.

One disadvantage I have this year is that I have to get the room set up every day an hour before my show starts, which cuts into vital flyering time. I need to figure out a way around this.

The first show itself was a good start. The eight people laughed a decent amount at mostly the right points, I didn’t let the energy dip and made it through the entire set without looking at my notes or even writing my set on my hand.

The second show was much better. I must have at least 20 people in and they were great. There were some big laughs throughout. The show isn’t quite where I want it yet, but it’s getting there with every performance. And it now feels as though I have an actual show on my hands instead of an unsuccessful side-project.